Theodor Herzl and the Basic Income plans

One hundred and twenty years ago, Theodor Herzl published a cautionary tale about what we know today as Universal basic income plans. He probably based his concerns upon the experience of the Romans under the Lex Frumentaria (buy grain from North Africa and Sicily and distribute it to citizens at a low price) plan. See also Gaius Gracchus.

Theodor Herzl wrote the story in German, and it was translated into Hebrew. I remember having read the Hebrew translation of the story at my childhood.

When I wanted to present to English speakers a contrarian point of view about the Universal basic income plans, I found to my surprise that no English translation of the story existed.

Well, now the English translation of Herzl’s story is now available for your enjoyment and education.

Author: Omer Zak

I am deaf since birth. I played with big computers which eat punched cards and spew out printouts since age 12. Ever since they became available, I work and play with desktop size computers which eat keyboard keypresses and spew out display pixels. Among other things, I developed software which helped the deaf in Israel use the telephone network, by means of home computers equipped with modems. Several years later, I developed Hebrew localizations for some cellular phones, which helped the deaf in Israel utilize the cellular phone networks. I am interested in entrepreneurship, Science Fiction and making the world more accessible to people with disabilities.

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